Astrophysicist Franco Vazza from the University of Bologna and neurosurgeon Alberto Feletti from the University of Verona conducted a joint study and found that cosmic networks of galaxies and networks of neurons in the human brain are surprisingly similar.

A simulated matter distribution of the cosmic web (left) vs. the observed distribution of neuronal bodies in the cerebellum (right)
A simulated matter distribution of the cosmic web (left) vs. the observed distribution of neuronal bodies in the cerebellum (right)

The difference in the scale of these networks is obvious, but this does not prevent them from creating structures with the same levels of complexity and self-service.

It is believed that there are about 69 billion neurons in the neural network. The space network consists of at least 100 billion galaxies. In both systems, only 30% of their mass is galaxies and neurons, which form long fibers and nodes. The remaining 70% both in the brain and the universe are components that play a passive role in the system. In the brain, it is water, and in space, it is dark energy.

Several more parameters characterize both a neural network and a space network: the average number of connections in each node and clustering of several connections in central nodes.

Scientists suggest that both networks develop following similar physical principles, which is why they are so similar.